Skip to main content
Learn how AbbVie and Ironwood can help you save on LINZESS. Call 1-855-226-3937 or click to LEARN MORE
A woman shops at a local farmers market for Low FODMAP foods. A woman shops at a local farmers market for Low FODMAP foods.

YOUR MAP
TO A
LOW
FODMAP DIET

In addition to a treatment plan, a Low FODMAP diet can help you manage constipation and the unwanted symptoms that go along with it: gas, bloating, and belly pain. Eating fewer FODMAPs can go a long way in improving your gut health. But what exactly are FODMAPs?

Breaking Down “FODMAP”

FODMAP stands for “Fermentable Oligosaccharide Disaccharide Monosaccharide and Polyols.” Don’t worry—there won’t be a quiz! Simply put, FODMAPs are carbs that your small intestine doesn’t absorb well—so do your best to avoid them whenever possible. Here’s a look at the FODMAPs:

An illustration of vegetablesAn illustration of vegetablesAn illustration of vegetables

Oligosaccharides

Wheat, rye, legumes, and fruits and veggies such as garlic and onions.

An illustration of milk and yogurt. An illustration of milk and yogurt. An illustration of milk and yogurt.

Disaccharides

Milk, yogurt, and soft cheese—lactose is the
main carb here.

An illustration of pears and apples. An illustration of pears and apples. An illustration of pears and apples.

Monosaccharides

Fruits like apples and pears
and sweeteners that are chock-full of fructose.

An illustration of peaches and blackberries. An illustration of peaches and blackberries. An illustration of peaches and blackberries.

Polyols

Fruits like peaches and blackberries and low-cal sweeteners that end in “-ol.”

Mapping out a
Low FODMAP Diet

An illustrated guide to a Low FODMAP diet including food swaps, reading labels, portion control preparation, patience, and identifying triggers.An illustrated guide to a Low FODMAP diet including food swaps, reading labels, portion control preparation, patience, and identifying triggers.An illustrated guide to a Low FODMAP diet including food swaps, reading labels, portion control preparation, patience, and identifying triggers.

More Like This

A delicious spread of Low FODMAP foods. A delicious spread of Low FODMAP foods. A delicious spread of Low FODMAP foods.

Is Your Pantry FODMAP-Friendly?

Read the article
A delicious and healthy bowl of cereal topped with banana and blueberry. A delicious and healthy bowl of cereal topped with banana and blueberry. A delicious and healthy bowl of cereal topped with banana and blueberry.

Good for Your Gut—Flavorful Food Swaps

Read the article
A bowl full of healthy and nutritious salad greens. A bowl full of healthy and nutritious salad greens. A bowl full of healthy and nutritious salad greens.

Tackling IBS-C Triggers

Read the article
Back to top -

IMPORTANT RISK INFORMATION

  • Do not give LINZESS to children who are less than 2 years of age. It may harm them. LINZESS can cause severe diarrhea and your child could get severe dehydration (loss of a large amount of body water and salt).
  • Do not take LINZESS if a doctor has told you that you have a bowel blockage (intestinal obstruction).

Before you take LINZESS, tell your doctor about your medical conditions, including if you are:

  • Pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if LINZESS will harm your unborn baby.
  • Breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. You and your doctor should decide if you will take LINZESS and breastfeed.

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

Side Effects

LINZESS can cause serious side effects, including diarrhea, which is the most common side effect and can sometimes be severe. Diarrhea often begins within the first 2 weeks of LINZESS treatment. Stop taking LINZESS and call your doctor right away if you get severe diarrhea during treatment with LINZESS.

Other common side effects of LINZESS include gas, stomach-area (abdominal) pain, swelling, or a feeling of fullness or pressure in your abdomen (distension). Call your doctor or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away if you develop unusual or severe stomach-area (abdominal) pain, especially if you also have bright red, bloody stools or black stools that look like tar.

These are not all the possible side effects of LINZESS. For more information, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

USES

LINZESS® (linaclotide) is a prescription medication used in adults to treat irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS‑C) and chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC). "Idiopathic" means the cause of the constipation is unknown. It is not known if LINZESS is safe and effective in children less than 18 years of age.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

If you are having difficulty paying for your medicine, AbbVie and Ironwood may be able to help. Visit AbbVie.com/myAbbVieAssist to learn more.

Please see full Prescribing Informationopen pdf in new tab including Boxed Warning and Medication Guide.open pdf in new tab

Expand +

IMPORTANT RISK INFORMATION

  • Do not give LINZESS to children who are less than 2 years of age. It may harm them. LINZESS can cause severe diarrhea and your child could get severe dehydration (loss of a large amount of body water and salt).