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A bowl full of healthy and nutritious salad greens. A bowl full of healthy and nutritious salad greens.

TACKLING
IBS-C
TRIGGERS

Breaks in routine, the wrong foods, and stress are all common IBS-C triggers that can bring on a flare-up and make your symptoms worse. But with a treatment that is right for you and a closer look at your own triggers, you can tackle the situation.

Common Triggers

An illustration of a person sleeping.   An illustration of a person sleeping.   An illustration of a person sleeping.

Lack
of sleep

An illustration of french fries.An illustration of french fries.An illustration of french fries.

Certain foods
or diet

An illustration of a cup of coffee.An illustration of a cup of coffee.An illustration of a cup of coffee.

Too much
caffeine

An illustration of a woman with stress and anxiety.  An illustration of a woman with stress and anxiety.  An illustration of a woman with stress and anxiety.

Stress and
anxiety

Your Trigger Cheat Sheet

If you’re living with IBS-C, you’ve probably experienced one or more of these scenarios, but the fear of a flare-up shouldn’t hold you back from doing the things you love. Here are some strategies to prep for any situation:

An illustration of a couple on vacation with a palm tree in the background. An illustration of a couple on vacation with a palm tree in the background. An illustration of a couple on vacation with a palm tree in the background.

The Travel Trigger

Mary was so ready for her vacation. She planned the whole trip down to the minute: sightseeing, museum tours, and all the must-try restaurants. What she didn’t plan for was vacation constipation. Long days and rich meals had Mary putting down the selfie stick.

A better way to travel:

  • Plan short outings and pack gut-friendly options for regular snack sessions
  • Watch your portions and stick to foods you know when dining out
  • Stick to a routine and take your meds at the same time each day
An illustration of a woman considering her food options. An illustration of a woman considering her food options. An illustration of a woman considering her food options.

The Diet Trigger

Jess had been looking forward to her brother’s engagement party all week. (She did set them up after all.) But the stress of entertaining and the temptation of hors d’oeuvres left her feeling bloated, self-conscious, and anything but festive when it came time for the toast.

A better way to join the fun:

  • Skip the cheese tray and opt for high fiber crudité
  • Drink plenty of water to keep things moving
  • Wear something comfortable, so you can focus on enjoying the party
An illustration of a person being stressed out.An illustration of a person being stressed out.An illustration of a person being stressed out.

The Stress Trigger

Joe was thrilled when he landed his dream job. But the added responsibility meant early mornings and late nights, sending Joe’s daily routine out the window. The bottom line: the added stress (and caffeine) had his stomach in knots.

A better way to work:

  • Put together a calming playlist for a relaxing commute
  • Spend less time at the coffee maker and more time at the water cooler
  • Relax your mind and your muscles with a few minutes of meditation

More Like This

Three women walk together along a beach and discuss their game plan for IBS-C (Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation).Three women walk together along a beach and discuss their game plan for IBS-C (Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation).Three women walk together along a beach and discuss their game plan for IBS-C (Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation).

Make a Game Plan for IBS-C

Read the article
A IBS-C (Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation) or CIC (Chronic Idiopathic Constipation) patient meets with her doctor. A IBS-C (Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation) or CIC (Chronic Idiopathic Constipation) patient meets with her doctor. A IBS-C (Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation) or CIC (Chronic Idiopathic Constipation) patient meets with her doctor.

Keeping in Touch with Your Doctor

Read the article
A woman shops at a local farmers market for Low FODMAP foods. A woman shops at a local farmers market for Low FODMAP foods. A woman shops at a local farmers market for Low FODMAP foods.

Your Map to a Low FODMAP Diet

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IMPORTANT RISK INFORMATION

  • Do not give LINZESS to children who are less than 2 years of age. It may harm them. LINZESS can cause severe diarrhea and your child could get severe dehydration (loss of a large amount of body water and salt).
  • Do not take LINZESS if a doctor has told you that you have a bowel blockage (intestinal obstruction).

Before you take LINZESS, tell your doctor about your medical conditions, including if you are:

  • Pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if LINZESS will harm your unborn baby.
  • Breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. You and your doctor should decide if you will take LINZESS and breastfeed.

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

Side Effects

LINZESS can cause serious side effects, including diarrhea, which is the most common side effect and can sometimes be severe. Diarrhea often begins within the first 2 weeks of LINZESS treatment. Stop taking LINZESS and call your doctor right away if you get severe diarrhea during treatment with LINZESS.

Other common side effects of LINZESS include gas, stomach-area (abdominal) pain, swelling, or a feeling of fullness or pressure in your abdomen (distension). Call your doctor or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away if you develop unusual or severe stomach-area (abdominal) pain, especially if you also have bright red, bloody stools or black stools that look like tar.

These are not all the possible side effects of LINZESS. For more information, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

USES

LINZESS® (linaclotide) is a prescription medication used in adults to treat irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS‑C) and chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC). "Idiopathic" means the cause of the constipation is unknown. It is not known if LINZESS is safe and effective in children less than 18 years of age.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

If you are having difficulty paying for your medicine, AbbVie and Ironwood may be able to help. Visit AbbVie.com/myAbbVieAssist to learn more.

Please see full Prescribing Informationopen pdf in new tab including Boxed Warning and Medication Guide.open pdf in new tab

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IMPORTANT RISK INFORMATION

  • Do not give LINZESS to children who are less than 2 years of age. It may harm them. LINZESS can cause severe diarrhea and your child could get severe dehydration (loss of a large amount of body water and salt).